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Plumber Epsom, 310 Reaver House, 12 East Street, Epsom, Surrey KT17 1HX

The Assembly Rooms Epsom

The Assembly Rooms Epsom

The Assembly Rooms Epsom were built in 1690 at the height of Epsom society. It was when the local springs made Epsom a fashionable spa town. They now house a popular public house owned by J D Wetherspoons. It serving a range of alcoholic and beverages, soft drinks and affordably priced food. For most of the twentieth century the Assembly Rooms in Epsom were converted into a draper’s shop and a building society.

In fact, the pub lies in the centre of Epsom at one end of the town’s market, a central location which was important for the original building. Also with the growth in leisure tourism seeking the curative powers of the spa water, came a range of buildings designed to meet the needs of the society it attracted. The Assembly Rooms, as still now, were ideally placed for residents. Also for the visitors to access in the centre of town.

Societal Centre of Epsom’s Days Past

The Assembly Rooms Epsom were built, as in other popular spa towns of the era such as Bath, or major cities such as London and York, as a place to accommodate the needs of the upper social classes to meet. The building was a gathering place for members of both sexes of high society, and one of very few public places of entertainment open to both men and women. However, except for coffee houses, gentlemen’s clubs and theatres, there was little opportunity outside of entertaining at home to meet and socialise.

They hosted frequent events such as both conventional and masked balls, public concerts, assemblies and salons, where conversation and music was designed and organised to entertain. Also attendees were usually screened for these events to make sure no one of insufficient rank gained admittance; admission was by subscription only; and all unmarried women had to be chaperoned. The Assembly Rooms now are open to families and all ages. Also with a licensed outside area, WiFi, and TV screens. In addition, the building is fully accessible for a drink, a meal or as in times past, a gathering for meeting and conversation year long round – no subscription needed.

When you are looking for more interesting information on Epsom, visit the homepage of your Local Plumbing Epsom website.

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